Schedule

Day 1

Keynote
9.00 Location text..

Talk title

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Keynote
10.00 Location text..

Talk title

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nunc cursus efficitur lectus, iaculis semper felis dignissim sed. Fusce vitae convallis leo. Nullam at tortor tempus, sollicitudin tortor sed, elementum purus. Sed non est nec erat faucibus consectetur nec vel sem. Proin a ante eros. Vestibulum pulvinar, sapien a ornare congue, lacus ex rhoncus mauris, vel dictum urna sapien tempus leo. Ut quis ultricies mi, quis dapibus orci. Maecenas malesuada, sem ac elementum congue, ipsum velit elementum erat, id consectetur metus nunc non urna. Duis libero lacus, semper hendrerit quam vitae, sodales viverra lorem. Suspendisse metus magna, gravida vitae nunc ac, consequat consequat enim. Nunc laoreet eros eget nunc maximus tempus. Quisque ultricies risus non turpis porta fringilla.

10.00 Location text..

Talk title

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nunc cursus efficitur lectus, iaculis semper felis dignissim sed. Fusce vitae convallis leo. Nullam at tortor tempus, sollicitudin tortor sed, elementum purus. Sed non est nec erat faucibus consectetur nec vel sem. Proin a ante eros. Vestibulum pulvinar, sapien a ornare congue, lacus ex rhoncus mauris, vel dictum urna sapien tempus leo. Ut quis ultricies mi, quis dapibus orci. Maecenas malesuada, sem ac elementum congue, ipsum velit elementum erat, id consectetur metus nunc non urna. Duis libero lacus, semper hendrerit quam vitae, sodales viverra lorem. Suspendisse metus magna, gravida vitae nunc ac, consequat consequat enim. Nunc laoreet eros eget nunc maximus tempus. Quisque ultricies risus non turpis porta fringilla.

Day 2

Doors open for registration
9:30

Grab a coffee, network with your fellow delegates and visit our exhibitors.

10:00

Design Thinking from IBM

IBM is over 100 years old. For many decades the company has been a technology-first organisation. In 2012, the new CEO mandated to put people first, not technology by stating “There’s one key to our future growth: the client experience.” IBM Design Thinking is how we put people first, encourage risk taking, and learn through making. As IBM scales the practice of design thinking across the globe, design thinking itself has morphed and shifted to more effectively create a culture that puts people first. Come and see how IBM increases velocity through design thinking.

11:00

Further Together: Designing Culture Change

The Global Experience Language (GEL) is the BBC’s shared design framework. It underpins the design of the organisation’s entire online output. The GEL UX team facilitate it’s origination, development and reuse, which affords a more consistent user experience across the BBC online.

David and Nikos’ talk focusses on how their design department’s joined-up approach is inspiring culture change, the importance of shared ownership and how it benefits the BBC’s ongoing digital transformation.

11:45

The Secret Life of Comedy

It has never been easier to make a web site, and our digital toolbox has never been greater. At the same time, we seem more concerned with automating our process and systemising design than with creative thinking and generating ideas. Is web design purely about utility? Is it all about convention? Is it a science? Or is there room for beauty, expression and art?

In this talk, Espen will take a tongue-in-cheek look at the state of web design, explore different creative mindsets, and show how adding a pinch of comedy can make a real difference to the bottom line.

11:00

Behaviour Models and Their Hidden Uses

Launching a new product is a risky business. Many perfectly designed products don’t get the success they deserve. Even with great teams behind them, a wealth of financial resources and a clear company direction, many products fail big when they hit the market. This subject is something that bugged me for many years, and I believe I’ve worked out why. After all this time, I’ve managed to reverse engineer why some products win and others lose, and I’d like to share this with you. This is not only your chance to improve your Discovery phase, but also to take your products to a whole new level; by applying basic human psychology to your designs.

11:45

The Science of Typography

This is going to be weird. You’ve probably heard about applications that automatically design websites. Are they a good thing? Can we learn something from these applications and create a tool that helps designers, instead of replacing them? This talk explores what happens when you apply algorithms and math to typography.

LunchBreak

Keynote
13:30

Digital Assistants, Facebook Quizzes, and Fake News! You Won’t Believe What Happens Next

As citizens of the web, do we know what is happening to the data we’re sharing about ourselves publicly and privately? As designers and builders of the web, are we ethical about the data we obtain from others?

There’s a dark underbelly to the web we love, and its darkness is rooted in the core decisions we make about our products. This talk will explain more, and share how we can use the Ethical Design Manifesto to make it better.

2:30

The corp-to-chicken equation or why large corporates turn to chickens in the face of innovative endeavours

Corporates are built in a way that helps them to avoid risk under any circumstances. There are entire departments just to deal with corporate risks and to ensure that corps don’t take risks that are too high. This avoidance of risk taking is being reflected within the whole organisation, its org structure and processes, but it does not stay there. It is also cascaded down to the level of individuals, and their behaviour within organisational boundaries. The mantra is: “Don’t risk anything – stay safe within your comfort zone.”

In our talk we want to identify and discuss five types of risks large corps have to take if they want to be innovative – just to name some: The giant truck effect (foresight), the protecting the kingdom-fallacy (attribution of success) and the silverback problem (decision-making). We will explain how these risks are deeply rooted in how corporates genuinely function and in how they have established and nurture their corporate culture. Finally, we also offer a short outlook how to deal with these challenges.

3:15

Changing the mindset of a 100 year old charity

The charity sector is extremely risk averse when it comes to the services they create and deliver, especially when it is in the face of something as serious as cancer. However, as our approach to fundraising becomes more playful, why can’t we take the same approach in the design of our services? 

My team has been working to make Macmillan Cancer Support more comfortable with experimentation and the word ‘failure’. With the introduction of an innovation process we are beginning to encourage our colleagues to understand user needs and to prototype before pilot. 

Changing the mindset of an organisation that is over a century old is no easy feat, so I’d like to share the lessons we have learned along the way.

4:00Break

4:30

Security vs. Usability: Why Not Both?

Security engineers often say that the most difficult problem in security is usability. Indeed, we have decades’ worth of examples of software that ended up being less secure in practice than its creators intended because of user interface shortcomings, ranging from PGP to password login forms. Nowadays, digital security and privacy are more important than ever before, given the growth of concerns over government surveillance, the rise of the Internet of Things, and the increasing amount of data that people are putting online. How can we close the gap between security engineers and designers so that users can avoid shooting themselves in the foot? This talk is about how to build interfaces with security and privacy as first-class priorities.

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